Friday, May 22, 2009

what do you think?

Yes...they are siblings...aren't they cute?

I just left a comment on another person's blog about how my husband who's (bi-racial or black...he always says..."Just don't call me late for dinner") and how he's the most NON racist - stereotyping person I know.

So of course I've got to play a little devil's advocate with that question?

What do you think?

Should children of different ethnic groups be raised by parents of another ethnic group?  O.k. I can't even write the question right because you already can guess I don't think it really matters. Real life dictates that issues crop up, but they are so minor in comparison to being in a loving godly home...

Anyhoo I have a friend (already asked her...she said I could post about her) who has children who are...not a little black...but straight up...not mixed...clearly African looking and well...she's NOT... 

When we'd go places together...people use to tell ME..."Wow...you have so many beautiful children..." and I'd say..."those over there are mine...and those are hers. can't you tell they have the same smile." 

So what do you think?  Does it really matter what color the parent's are?  Oh I can't even write it right...because I don't think it matters...but I'm curious if others do?

12 comments:

Lorrie said...

I'm commenting on my own blog...of COURSE it shouldn't matter if there are kids of different ethnic groups in a family...but WE ARE in America and some folks have a problem with this. Unfortunately I know some relatives who aren't for this (black and white) and I just keep thinking...how sad. God loves us all..black, red or white..it doesn't matter.

Erin said...

Oh, I'm so glad you posted this picture and question. My best friend when I had my oldest boy was black (I'm white)...one of our black co-workers saw her walking him in the stroller and laid into her about "perpetuating the Aunt Jemima stereotype by walking a white child"...I felt so sad for him that he thought that in 1992 and for her for having to deal with that when she was just spending time with a baby who loved her. Fast forward 20 years and my little sister wants to adopt older kids, harder to place kids, and worries that they won't be able to because the rules are changing and if they're aren't white kids, she won't get any kids.

Kids are kids, people are people...tall, short, black, white, boy, girl...we're all just doing the best we can.

mimi said...

I will be checking back to read your comments;) You know, I will be very interested in the answers.

You obviously know my opinion on the subject...LOL. Thanks for writing this post!!

L.H. said...

Lorie, I agree with you that parents who have children of a different race are well able to love them and be wonderful parents to them.

My mother is white and father is black. Based on my own experience, I will say that it is important for the parents to be sensitive to issues that their children may face(discrimination, bullying etc).

I only grew up with my mom and we lived in a racist white area where we experienced alot of hateful interactions with others because of our race. During those times, my brother and I wanted to move and felt that my mother couldn't understand how much we were going through. That was a sad and lonely time for us.

So, I think that if parents are going to adopt children of other races, they should be sensitive and have a plan for how they will deal with such situations if they arise.

BTW: I tagged you with a Kreative Blogger Award. You can read my blog for details on how to respond.

Laurie Ann said...

Great post and very thought-provoking. When I briefly considered adoption, I didn't care what color the children were and vowed to teach them about their heritage. I cannot imagine that it matters. Jesus didn't differentiate on loving only Jewish children (vs. Gentile); He said love them ALL.

Does it really matter what color the parents are? Only the color of their hearts, IMO. God doesn't look at the outward appearance and my feelings are that we should become alot more like Him and focus on the heart.

Stopping by to so thanks for your sweet comment At the Well today. Glad you popped in! What a blessing!

Beth in NC said...

I am so glad to see things changing here in the south. Years ago, the churches were so divided on Sunday mornings. That made it really difficult on multi-raced families. Someone was going to feel "different" ...

I have several friends who have children of a different race. One friend has children from Ethiopia.

Our church is International and we have every shade of skin color equally blended throughout. It is a beautiful reflection of heaven.

I think God builds families in many different ways.

Darcie said...

As seeing we adopted from China...I don't think it matters one ounce. Like you said...God loves every living soul! Every living soul!

Hopping on as a follower hope that is okay. Came over to see your Friday Flashback and had to read this post first and comment on it. Thanks for posting it.

Muthering Heights said...

NO! It doesn't matter at all! :)

Patrice @ The Soap Seduction said...

While I believe that the ultimate goal is to provide a safe, loving home for any child, no matter what their color is, when adopting or raising children of different ethnic backgrounds, we must be sensitive and understanding to the obstacles they'll face and be prepared to deal with them as they arise. It does my heart good though to see mixed race families. It gives me hope that some day we'll all live in a colorless society (I aint holding my breath though....)

Christine A. Mayo said...

The dialog is just great, it will be our generation that picks up the baton and run with it, showing the world, it does't matter what color your skin is , but it does matter if you are not motivated by "Love"......Happy holidays all.

Daphine said...

I think that it should TOTALLY not matter! But then again...I'm biased!

Kristine said...

Thanks for posting this. I wrestle with this. I am a caucasian woman who has an African born son and a daughter on the way.

We deal with this issue on a daily basis. I am so concerned about what African-Americans in particular, think of us. So far, it has been nothing but positive. Most say "thank you for raising one of 'ours'". He is my son and I pray everyday that he will grow up feeling like his parents did right by him, that they did the best they could. I pray for wisdom and guidance in raising him to be proud of who he is; his race, his culture, his history and his family. I am so thankful to be his mom!